If It’s Not a Rant, It’s a Rave: A Review of This Savage Song by Victoria Schwab

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Title: This Savage Song
Author: Victoria Schwab
Publication date: July 5, 2016
Publisher: Greenwillow Books
Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy, Paranormal
Format: Signed copy from UppercaseBox

About the book:

There’s no such thing as safe.

Kate Harker wants to be as ruthless as her father. After five years and six boarding schools, she’s finally going home to prove that she can be.

August Flynn wants to be human. But he isn’t. He’s a monster, one that can steal souls with a song. He’s one of the three most powerful monsters in a city overrun with them. His own father’s secret weapon.

Their city is divided.

Their city is crumbling.

Kate and August are the only two who see both sides, the only two who could do something.

But how do you decide to be a hero or a villain when it’s hard to tell which is which?

LINKS: Goodreads | Amazon | B&N |  The Book Depository


Rants and Raves of This Savage Song

If Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Joss Whedon’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer had a book-baby, their offspring would be Victoria Schwab’s This Savage Song. This book has the all the right elements to a story that is both socially aware of prejudices and discrimination, while also situating the reader in a high school setting that is heavily fogged with tragedy, comedy, and mystery. Each chapter is filled with villains, twists, and possible heroes-in-the-making. And just like every coin that has two sides, Schwab’s novel creates monsters that have the stigma to be vigilantes, while humans have the capacity of being actual nightmares.

One of my favorite things about fantasy books is that they have the power to pull you into an alternate world. And although fantasies are a good way to escape the real world, I love that many books, like Victoria Schwab’s This Savage Song, parallels the complications and injustices that shadow reality. From the very beginning, Schwab’s elegant writing had me hooked. I could not turn away from the monstrous world that her main characters, Kate Harker and August Flynn, inhabited. Kate and August are complete opposites, two different beings from different sides of a wasted city, but they use their differences to help each other, creating a friendship based on accountability and trust.  

Schwab layers her fast-paced storyline with undertones of friendship, family, and vindication, which kept me invested in the story for one sitting. An uprising is approaching, and I cannot wait to read the fates of Kate and August in Our Dark Duet

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NOTE:  I received this book in an Uppercasebox Subscription. I was not provided a copy of this book by the author or the publisher in an exchange for a review; I reviewed it at my own discretion.  All statements and opinions in this review are mine.

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5 thoughts on “If It’s Not a Rant, It’s a Rave: A Review of This Savage Song by Victoria Schwab

  1. Lovely review! I really enjoyed this one as well–I find myself thinking of Kate Harker every time I see someone with metallic silver nail polish or put some on myself. I can’t wait to see how everything wraps up in Our Dark Duet.

  2. I don’t know why I keep pushing this one off. I think maybe b/c I wanna read Vicious first? I don’t know, but I know I HAVE to get to it before the end of the year. Great review!

  3. Pingback: Treat Yo Shelf: January 2017 Monthly Recap | rants and raves of a bibliophile

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